+- +-

+-Stats

Members
Total Members: 11
Latest: Kiryu2012
New This Month: 2
New This Week: 2
New Today: 0
Stats
Total Posts: 40
Total Topics: 24
Most Online Today: 2
Most Online Ever: 13
(October 14, 2018, 08:47:27 pm)
Users Online
Members: 0
Guests: 1
Total: 1

Poll

Who wins?

Tiger Quoll
0 (0%)
Wildcat
0 (0%)

Total Members Voted: 0

Author Topic: Tiger Quoll vs Wildcat  (Read 20 times)

SquamataOrthoptera

  • Newbie
  • Posts: 11
  • Karma: +0/-1
    • View Profile
Tiger Quoll vs Wildcat
« on: September 29, 2018, 11:47:10 am »
Wildcat-Felis silvestris

The wildcat is a species complex of small cats, comprising the European wildcat (Felis silvestris) and the African wildcat (F. lybica). The former is native to Europe and the Caucasus. The latter the ancestor of the domestic cat (F. catus) ranges through much of Africa; Southwest and Central Asia into India and western China.

Compared to other members of the Felinae, the wildcat is a small species, but is nonetheless larger than the housecat. The wildcat is similar in appearance to a striped tabby cat, but has relatively longer legs, a more robust build, and a greater cranial volume. The tail is long, and usually slightly exceeds one-half of the animal's body length. Its skull is more spherical in shape than that of the jungle and leopard cat. The ears are moderate in length, and broad at the base. The eyes are large, with vertical pupils, and yellowish-green irises. Its dentition is relatively smaller and weaker than the jungle cat's. The species size varies according to Bergmann's rule, with the largest specimens occurring in cool, northern areas of Europe (such as Scotland and Scandinavia) and of Middle Asia (such as Mongolia, Manchuria and Siberia). Males measure 43 to 91 cm (17 to 36 in) in body length, 23 to 40 cm (9.1 to 15.7 in) in tail length, and normally weigh 5 to 8 kg (11 to 18 lb). Females are slightly smaller, measuring 40 to 77 cm (16 to 30 in) in body length and 18 to 35 cm (7.1 to 13.8 in) in tail length, and weighing 3 to 5 kg (6.6 to 11.0 lb).



Tiger quoll-Dasyurus maculatus

The tiger quoll (Dasyurus maculatus), also known as the spotted-tail quoll, the spotted quoll, the spotted-tail dasyure or the tiger cat, is a carnivorous marsupial of the quoll genus Dasyurus native to Australia. With males and females weighing around 3.5 and 1.8 kg, respectively, it is mainland Australia's largest carnivorous marsupial, and the world's longest extant carnivorous marsupial (the biggest is the Tasmanian devil).

Tiger quolls live in a variety of habitats, but seem to prefer wet forests such as rainforests and closed eucalypt forest. They are arboreal, but only moderately, as 11% of their travelling is done above ground. Prey items eaten by quolls include insects, crayfish, lizards, snakes, birds, domestic poultry, small mammals, platypus, rabbits, arboreal possums, pademelons, small wallabies, and wombats. They may scavenge larger prey such as kangaroos, feral pigs, cattle, and dingoes. However, the tiger quoll does not scavenge as much as the Tasmanian devil. Much of the prey eaten by the quoll are arboreal. They can climb high into trees and make nocturnal hunts for possums and birds. The flexibility of their diets suggests their prey base is not detrimentally affected by bushfires. When hunting, a quoll stalks its prey, stopping only when its head is up. It then launches its attack, executing a killing bite to the base of the skull or top of the neck, depending on the size of the prey. The quoll will pin small prey down with its fore paws and then deliver the bite. With large prey, it jumps and latches on its back and bites the neck.

« Last Edit: September 29, 2018, 11:51:05 am by SquamataOrthoptera »

Social Buttons


 

+-Recent Topics

Allidrake vs Wraith by Kiryu2012
October 16, 2018, 07:25:07 pm

Lizard predation by SquamataOrthoptera
October 08, 2018, 04:37:57 pm

Canidae pictoral by SquamataOrthoptera
October 07, 2018, 12:54:09 pm

Dynasties: First Look Trailer by zergthe
October 05, 2018, 07:43:43 am

Animal feats by SquamataOrthoptera
October 02, 2018, 12:27:07 pm

Tiger Quoll vs Wildcat by SquamataOrthoptera
September 29, 2018, 11:47:10 am

Reptile Size by SquamataOrthoptera
September 25, 2018, 04:46:05 pm

Visual comparisons by Dragon Maw
September 18, 2018, 05:01:33 pm

Monitor lizard pictorial by SquamataOrthoptera
September 18, 2018, 05:10:46 am

Felid pictorial by Ceratodromeus
September 16, 2018, 04:05:43 pm